Targeted Care Packages

Targeted Care Packages (TCPs) are a Victorian State Government initiative, to create a more innovative and flexible Out Of Home Care (OOHC) system to better respond to specific needs of children.

In particular, TCPs are intended to enable children to move from residential care and are expected to make sure that children are safe, healthy and living in stable arrangements where they are given the opportunity to participate in and enjoy the things that every child or young person needs for healthy development.

What is a Targeted Care Package?

  • An allocation of funding and target that is tailored specifically to meet the individual needs of a particular child or young person
  • Attached to a specific child or young person
  • Based on an assessment of that child or young person’s needs
  • Funds for one or a number of clearly articulated supports to meet the child’s needs
  • Available for as long as the child needs (subject to review)
  • Transparently acquitted
  • Provides an alternative to a residential care placement and provides better outcomes
Click here to see the DHHS 2016 TCP guidelines

Who is eligible for a TCP?

There are two groups of children and young people eligible for Targeted Care Packages:
1. At risk of entering residential care
2. Currently in residential care

Where a child or young person is in either of these two groups, funding is available for a package for that child or young person.

In either of these cases, funding is only available where:
•   the existing models of care, or levels of support available, are insufficient to support a successful transition out of residential care and the new care arrangement is judged to provide improved outcomes; or
•   the existing models of care, or levels of support available, are insufficient to prevent the child or young person being placed in residential care and the new care arrangement is judged to provide improved outcomes.

Only children and young people subject to a child protection order are eligible for a TCP.  The priority cohorts for TCPs are Aboriginal children, primary school age children, and children and young people with a disability. However, this does not mean that only these children are eligible for a TCP. Any child or young person in residential care or at risk of entering residential care is potentially eligible to receive a TCP.


TCPs with Amicus

Amicus is ideally positioned to develop and implement TCPs. With closely aligned values and a well developed model of one on one support coordination and delivery, TCP participants benefit from our extensive experience and a proven track record of formulating creative, flexible and optimistic initiatives and strategies for working with young people, families and statuary departments. This enables us to respond more effectively and collaboratively to identified need, at the same time as improving the safety and well being of children in care.


Who identifies as child potentially suitable for a TCP?

The process undertaken by departmental staff in collaboration with service providers has already identified a significant number of children and young people currently residing in residential care who are potentially suitable for a TCP.
In the future, any professional involved in the life of a child in residential care should be able to identify them as potentially suitable for a TCP and this is an issue that should be proactively and formally considered as a part of any case or care planning process concerning a child in residential care.
The availability of TCPs should now mean that one of the key questions a child or young person’s care team should be considering on a regular basis is whether a TCP could be used to help the child transition out of residential care.


What’s next?

Ask our Amicus TCP coordinator for further information about Targeted Care Packages.

Please contact:

Sophia White
03 54412666

Let’s discuss whether a TCP is the most beneficial strategy for a child or young person in a your care, or whether an alternative approach is better.

We assist with the application, inter-departmental communication and ongoing coordination of a TCP should you go forward, and are very happy to provide support arrangements if that is appropriate for the individual in question.